Real-life Rwanda

by Dan Decort

A sunburn is the least of their concerns. With the hot heat scorching down, how can you not notice how uncomfortable the situation must be?

Survival skills are key

Years lie ahead for the children who walk these long dirt roads. Learning to survive starts at an age that most of us would never comprehend. Dust kicks up and is blown around while trying to trek to and from an operating water pump where they fill each one of the canisters up and push them back to their homes on bikes that most would use for riding.

You and I most likely have water that spouts from at least one faucet in our home. Imagine going the distance of 1 to 3 miles a day to fulfill a simple necessity such as water.

Children are taught at a young age the survival skills necessary for life.

Often times we worry about having to wake up early to drive to work. We worry about the workload on hand once we are in the office. We even stress about what to cook for dinner after driving to a grocery store located 2 miles away. But not for them.

Memories last a lifetime

Think about the last memory you had. Is it the vacation you’ll never forget with your family as a child? Is it the moment you hiked for leisure in the crisp, spring air? Many of the memories those in poverty-stricken areas hold point to survival. It’s the act of searching for clean water and food that they are currently having to process day in and day out.

The stories we share are real because we’ve been there in person. We take these photos. We talk to the people. This is their life and it can only be enhanced with the help of those from the outside, like you.

Remember, 100 percent of all donations made to the USANA True Health Foundation ALWAYS go toward changing lives across the world. We thank you for each and every contribution made and hope you’ll catch the vision to assist those in need frequently.

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